An analysis of conscience in the black cat by edgar allan poe

He goes on to blame "the Fiend Intemperance" which caused the "radical alteration" in his mood. He then proceeds to wall up his wife's body in the basement and calmly relates the details of his basement construction project, commenting that "For a purpose such as this the cellar was well adapted.

At length, I even offered her personal violence. He says that he does not try to prove a series of causes and effects but that he must relate a chain of facts. I did not, for some weeks, strike or otherwise violently ill-use it, but gradually—very gradually—I came to look upon it with unutterable loathing, and to flee silently from its odious presence as from the breath of a pestilence.

For three more days, this bliss continues. The narrator is so mad at his wife that he takes the worst possible action. Poe plays with the idea of the power of a disturbed mind. In the morning, the narrator of "The Black Cat" felt horrible about the cruel act.

Upon its head, with red extended mouth and solitary eye of fire, sat the hideous beast whose craft had seduced me into murder, and whose informing voice had consigned me to the hangman.

We had birds, gold-fish, a fine dog, rabbits, a small monkey, and a cat. I suffered myself to use intemperate language to my wife. The titular cat is named Pluto after the Roman god of the Underworld. The narrator seems to have had the feeling that they the animals must pay for what they have done.

I quivered not in a muscle. The narrator explains how from a young age he was noted for his tenderness and humanity, as well as his fondness for animals.

Poe's Short Stories

I again plunged into excess, and soon drowned in wine all memory of the deed. I went so far as to regret the loss of the animal, and to look about me among the vile haunts which I now habitually frequented for another pet of the same species, and of somewhat similar appearance, with which to supply its place.

But because of the introduction, we know to be suspicious of this happy family scene. It is the quiet before the storm. At such times, although I longed to destroy it with a blow, I was yet withheld from so doing, partly by a memory of my former crime, but chiefly—let me confess it at once—by absolute dread of the beast.

Active Themes That very night, the narrator of "The Black Cat" and his wife were awoken by the sound of flames. The only difference is a large white patch on the animal's chest. The plastering had here in great measure resisted the action of the fire, a fact which I attributed to its having recently spread.

In the end we know he will die because in the beginning he has still, only hours before his death, come to terms and accepted responsibility for the consequences of his actions. In a rage, he strikes his wife in the head with the axe and kills her.

The fantastic is a literary category that contains elements of both the rational and the irrational. He tries desperately to explain what he sees with rational thought, but his mind is already infected with superstition and his explanations begin to sound far-fetched and somewhat insane.

But this is his downfall. What could cause an otherwise pleasant and humane youth, who grew up loving all animals, to turn into such a brute towards them — and, in time, towards a fellow human being.

Poe uses this foreshadowing message to increase the sense of horror for what is to follow.

Interesting Literature

The black cat may have been the agent that was instrumental in his downfall, but it is the man himself who is wholly responsible and Poe leaves little doubt of that. But there is also another symbolic act at play here — the weapon that the narrator uses is a quill pen, a writing tool, suggesting both the power and the violence that Poe feels towards the written word.

Poe uses this foreshadowing message to increase the sense of horror for what is to follow.

The Black Cat (short story)

A horrible moan comes from the wall and turns into a shriek, half terrified, half triumphant. The second and the third day passed, and still my tormentor came not. The set up of the story is nice and friendly.

The fits of rage which he encountered are finally brought to a culmination when his wife stops his attempted murder of their new cat. Some time later, he finds a similar cat in a tavern.

Observing my partiality for domestic pets, she lost no opportunity of procuring those of the most agreeable kind.

Analysis of Edgar Allan Poe’s Black Cat

This feeling disappears after time and the cats become the subject of his worst fits of rage. Additionally, his failure to understand his excessive love of animals foreshadows his inability to explain his motives for his actions.

Poe's Short Stories Summary and Analysis of The Black Cat Buy Study Guide Because he is due to die the next day, the narrator has decided to present the facts of a past event that has terrified and destroyed him, although he claims that he is not mad and hopes that someone else will be able to.

A summary of “The Black Cat” () in Edgar Allan Poe's Poe’s Short Stories. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Poe’s Short Stories and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

THE BLACK CAT BY EDGAR ALLAN POE 7^WYS`f7Taa]e. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Short Story: “The Black Cat” Author: Edgar Allan Poe, –49 altogether to my conscience, for the startling fact just detailed, it did not the less fail to make a deep impression upon my fancy.

For months I could not rid myself of the. In "The Black Cat," it is obvious that the chief effect that Poe wanted to achieve was a sense of absolute and total perverseness — "irrevocable PERVERSENESS." Clearly, many of the narrator's acts are without logic or motivation; they are merely acts of perversity.

Poe's Short Stories

A summary of “The Black Cat” () in Edgar Allan Poe's Poe’s Short Stories. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Poe’s Short Stories and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Analysis of Edgar Allan Poe’s Black Cat. The narrator’s first cat’s name Pluto is that of the Roman God of the underworld. violence and a lack of conscience. The second cat seemed to be much a kin in appearance to that of Pluto, being the relative same size, weight and it was even missing an eye.

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An analysis of conscience in the black cat by edgar allan poe
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Analysis of Edgar Allan Poe’s Black Cat - Essay